Wednesday, September 30, 2009

How to Treat Mange


Dog mange is a condition caused by the Demodex mite that causes irritation to the skin and hair loss. Most cases of mange appear in young dogs. Demodectic mange or Demodicosis is caused by the Demodex mite. The mite can be found in hair follicles. The Demodex mite, in small numbers is normal to be present on the skin of pet. Only when the mite begins to reproduce rapidly it causes the demodectic mange disease also called mange.

Treatment of canine mange

If the disease is temperate usually it heals spontaneously. Statistics show that 90% of demodectic mange cases are localized and can be treated locally. As a local treatment can be diluted Amitraz (3ml to 30 ml of mineral oil), or 1% rotenone ointment (Goodwinol ointment) and applied on the skin daily. In some cases these wounds will heal on their own but they may get worse before they improve. The numbers of mites should be reduced after only four weeks of treatment.

If the number of mites hasn’t reduced, the disease probably should be treated as a generalized form. If a dog develops generalized demodicosis, more aggressive treatment is usually needed. Although treatment is recommended, studies show that 30% to 50 % of generalized cases of mange heal will recover on their own without any treatment.

As a first step in treating the generalized form of mange you should start the treatment with a prescription product called Amitraz (Mitaban-Upjohn). Amitraz dips must be applied every two weeks. Before starting the treatment it is recommended that medium-length and longhaired dogs breeds to be clipped short, so that the solution can get into contact with the skin. First you have to wash the dog entirely with an antibacterial shampoo, like benzoyl peroxide shampoos, and carefully towel dry the dog. Before washing you dog with benzoyl peroxide shampoo you should apply a protective ophthalmic ointment to the eyes of the pet. After drying the dog, apply the Amitraz. Don’t forget to wear protective gloves when applying the Amitraz. Let your pet air-dry after the Amitraz dips. You might also want to administer an antibiotic to control secondary skin infections. This treatment require between 4 and 14 dips given at 2 week intervals. Skin scrapings should be tested for mites after every 4 dips. The treatment should continue until no mites will be found after two consecutive treatments. Dogs with generalized mange can be considered cured only after one year from the last treatment, if no mites we’re found during this period. As side effects to the Amitraz dips, some dogs may feel sedation or nausea.

Some dogs may not respond to this treatment. Although Ivemectin is not licensed for the treatment of demodectic mange, this is used by some veterinarians as treatment for this disease. In some cases, this drug offered good results. Large daily doses of liquid ivermectin must be administered so that the active ingredient should be effective against the Demodex mite. This should only be administered under close veterinary supervision. A second option if Amitraz dips did not work for your dog is Interceptor or Moxidectin. This is may be more effective than Ivemectin. No matter the treatment you choose to treat your dog for mange, you should first speak with a veterinarian.

By. Anne Ming

2 comments:

  1. I recently came across your blog and have been reading along. I thought I would leave my first comment. I don't know what to say except that I have enjoyed reading. Nice blog. I will keep visiting this blog very often.

    Alena

    http://dogfurniture.info

    ReplyDelete